Flying With Red Haircrow Productions

"Revitalization and Resurgence"

Category: Literary Interest

#BookReview “Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath” by Barbara Alice Mann (Seneca) in NAIS Vol.5.1 2018, University of Minnesota

Check out many other authors, books & Red Haircrow’s review of “Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath: The Twinned Cosmos of #Indigenous America” by Barbara Alice Mann (Seneca) in NAIS: Native American and Indigenous Studies’s latest journal, Vol.5.1 2018, at the University of Minnesota. Copies available here https://www.upress.umn.edu/journal-division/journals/nais

An excerpt from the two-page review: “Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath” is a collection of different and sometimes distinct indigenous perceptions, stories, legends and, while some people might call them myths, as in fiction, these are histories and explanations orally passed down that are believed true or are rooted in truth. As the aphorism states, “The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.”  Yet this book is more than a systematic gathering of related information primarily on serpents and thunderbirds or sky and earth beings, none unique or forbidden because it is all available if you know where to look, and far more than a work detailing then condemning European proclivities, past or present.  It is correction by example, of misattribution, mislabeling, and at times a “blow-by-blow” timeline of western interference and biased disdain for actual native wisdom and realities, while conversely other Europeans appropriated and erased.”

Book Launch July 5, 2018 in #Berlin- “Geschichte Schreiben” or “Writing History”

180621_Neue Rundschau_01Two of my poems, “The Color of Your Skin” and “Threatened by Beads” are included in this anthology of essays, art, poetry and more. First appearing in Red Ink International Journal’s special issue, Standing With Standing Rock (December 2016), my work was translated to German for this edition of Neue Rundschau, published by S. Fischer Verlag.

From the Facebook event page: Publication Launch of “Writing History”. Edited by Sharon Dodua Otoo and Manuela Bauche, who have asked writers, artists and academics about their vision of “writing history” for the latest edition of the magazine Neue Rundschau (S. Fischer Verlag).  As part of the symposium: “New Perspectives”. More information and registration details are available at the Xartsplitta website.

Synopsis: “Hegemonic historiographies – such as those about colonialism – are increasingly beginning to falter, are being rewritten and reperspectived. However, this does not happen by itself, but is also driven by the year-long struggles of activists, such as initiatives of Black people and other People of Colour. How can history be told differently? Is historical injustice comparable? Can history not also be decentered and complex?


Publikations-Launch von “Geschichte Schreiben”. Hg. von Sharon Dodua Otoo und Manuela Bauche. Im Rahmen des Symposiums: “Neue Perspektiven”
(www.xartsplitta.net/symposium-neue-perspektiven/)

“Hegemoniale Geschichtserzählungen – etwa über den Kolonialismus – geraten zuletzt zunehmend ins Wanken, werden umgeschrieben und neu perspektiviert. Das geschieht aber nicht von selbst, sondern wird auch durch die jahrelangen Kämpfe von Aktivist*innen, beispielsweise Initiativen Schwarzer Menschen und weiterer People of Colour, vorangetrieben. Wie lässt sich Geschichte anders schreiben? Ist historisches Unrecht vergleichbar? Lässt sich Geschichte nicht auch dezentriert und komplex erzählen?”

Näheres unter: www.xartsplitta.net/launch-geschichte-schreiben/

Informationen zur Anmeldung: www.xartsplitta.net/anmeldung_symposium/

The Importance of Real Native Stories

a sstepDon’t Let the Sun Step Over You“, the collected stories by Eva Tulene Watt assisted by Keith Basso made me write my mother and say, “Tell me a story”…and she did. She did, and it was good! If you’ve read the work, you’ll know why I add emphasis just so in the previous sentence. And why I wanted to hear from my mother about our people, our cousins, our family, about the past that touches the present and the future. The stories she was told or the things she observed.

Re-reading “Don’t Let the Sun Step Over You” made me want to hear songs. Made me want to hear songs I’d never heard before in this life and songs I already knew. One of them was “I’ve Been Around”, a popular Apache song that somehow voices all those stories of the hardworking, big-hearted, fierce, gentle, humorous, resilient, pragmatic, whimsical and wise Apache. “They’re always walking, walking, going around and doing things. They worked hard!”
I hear my ggrandmother’s voice again, and the stories she told and tried to tell us even when we weren’t listening, only halfway or transfixed cause they seemed light, even funny, but were deep. Stories when she was cooking or cleaning or working or chasing us (me!) with a switch when I had done something she directly told me not to do but I did it anyway because I was stubborn and/or curious.

Stories tell you why you should do things or why not to do other things. They give you purpose. They give you hope. They help you remember why you’re here now, right this very minute and not just what our ancestors endured. Stories help explain why they are important, to be kept, and remembered so our children understand and know. Some stories are shared with non-family, not-of our People, but others are special. Knowing them helps you understand why we defend them and how when someone copies you, culturally appropriates, or takes and changes your stories into their fantasies, these critically important parts of your culture and identity, it is beyond offensive but also really hurtful. Painful. That they do not care, that they make excuses, rationalize or say its just “fantasy” or “honoring” you is even worse. It’s terrible for native identities and cultures. Read the rest of this entry »

NEW! A Jazz Collaboration-Poetry & Piano: “Conejitos Amarillos” with Uli Lenz

NEW! From Flying With Red Haircrow Productions:

Poetry can be many things & come in many forms: just like jazz! “Conejitos Amarillos” is a short energetic piece composed and performed by client and friend, the German jazz pianist Uli Lenz, combined with a poem by Red Haircrow. Inspired by Lenz’s thoughts on the song’s creation and the combination of jazz and animation in the iconic Tom & Jerry cartoons, Red Haircrow created a simple but fast moving musical story of comedic gravity about the idiosyncracies of rabbits.