Flying With Red Haircrow Productions

"Revitalization and Resurgence"

Tag: cultural appropriation

“Can you #copyright #culture?” Article & Video from dBs Dialogues in #Berlin

From the event March 13, in the on-going series of discussions, dBs Dialogues in Berlin, at the dBs Film & Music School.  “Last Wednesday, we came together for the second panel discussion of our diversity-themed season of dBs Dialogues: Can You Copyright Culture? On the panel was award-winning writer, educator, filmmaker and psychologist of Native (Chiricahua Apache/Cherokee) and African-American heritage Red Haircrow, whose multimedia work often focuses on identity, indigeneity and intersectionality. He was joined by Dutch producer and veteran of Berlin’s techno scene Charlton Ravenberg and Polish rapper and Creative Music Production & Sound Engineering student Augustyn. The fascinating talk was facilitated by Screen Acting vocal coach, cultural advocate and intercultural negotiation specialist Cavana Hazelton.”

“‘Native’ Hobbyism is Modern Day Colonialism”-My new article at CBC

I was recently invited to write a counter-point essay for CBC, following my participant in the CBC.Docs documentary that premiered in January 2018 on Canadian television. Last July in Berlin, I  sat down with indigenous writer Drew Hayden Taylor on his search to understand why so many Germans choose to appropriate native cultures and/or dressing up and pretending to be “Indians”. The article was published on January 26th, ‘Native Hobbyism’ is Modern Day Colonialism. and specifically discusses how the effects of such practices, especially on Natives living in Germany, are overlooked by both non-natives and natives, which we explore in our own documentary, “Forget Winnetou”, which premiered in Germany in February 2018.

“Indigenous North Americans who live abroad often deal with rejection from relatives who only support or recognize those who choose to live in North America. They report negative experiences such as abandonment, disrespect of their heritage and lack of cultural support. This trauma leads to depression, anxiety and frustration because Indigenous living in Europe can’t simply be themselves.”

Red Haircrow’s Interview in #DerFreitag March 23rd-On #ForgetWinnetou! Doc, Native #Stereotypes & Eurocentric History

In Der Freitag’s print edition, on our upcoming documentary Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany, historical context and how the USA’s deliberate “alternative facts” or Eurocentric fabrication of history contributes to continuing racism, colonialism and oppression of Native Americans. Stereotypes are a symptom of the overall disease. Interview and article by Matthias Dell.

Our crowdfunding campaign is in its last days, please help us reach our goal and bring this important project to a wider audience, in its best possible form! At IndieGoGo.


Other recent interviews:

March 14th„Ich bin nur dem Nein begegnet“ at Deutschlandradio Kultur (Interview & podcast, in print & online, link to English version at the bottom of the article)

March 4th– “Glaubensbekenntnis Red Haircrow” at Süddeutsche Zeitung (Interview, in print & online)


Other important links for our documentary:

The Importance of Real Native Stories

a sstepDon’t Let the Sun Step Over You“, the collected stories by Eva Tulene Watt assisted by Keith Basso made me write my mother and say, “Tell me a story”…and she did. She did, and it was good! If you’ve read the work, you’ll know why I add emphasis just so in the previous sentence. And why I wanted to hear from my mother about our people, our cousins, our family, about the past that touches the present and the future. The stories she was told or the things she observed.

Re-reading “Don’t Let the Sun Step Over You” made me want to hear songs. Made me want to hear songs I’d never heard before in this life and songs I already knew. One of them was “I’ve Been Around”, a popular Apache song that somehow voices all those stories of the hardworking, big-hearted, fierce, gentle, humorous, resilient, pragmatic, whimsical and wise Apache. “They’re always walking, walking, going around and doing things. They worked hard!”
I hear my ggrandmother’s voice again, and the stories she told and tried to tell us even when we weren’t listening, only halfway or transfixed cause they seemed light, even funny, but were deep. Stories when she was cooking or cleaning or working or chasing us (me!) with a switch when I had done something she directly told me not to do but I did it anyway because I was stubborn and/or curious.

Stories tell you why you should do things or why not to do other things. They give you purpose. They give you hope. They help you remember why you’re here now, right this very minute and not just what our ancestors endured. Stories help explain why they are important, to be kept, and remembered so our children understand and know. Some stories are shared with non-family, not-of our People, but others are special. Knowing them helps you understand why we defend them and how when someone copies you, culturally appropriates, or takes and changes your stories into their fantasies, these critically important parts of your culture and identity, it is beyond offensive but also really hurtful. Painful. That they do not care, that they make excuses, rationalize or say its just “fantasy” or “honoring” you is even worse. It’s terrible for native identities and cultures. Read the rest of this entry »