Flying With Red Haircrow Productions

Cultural competency, Cooperation & Consultation

Tag: cultural appropriation

Red Haircrow’s Interview in #DerFreitag March 23rd-On #ForgetWinnetou! Doc, Native #Stereotypes & Eurocentric History

In Der Freitag’s print edition, on our upcoming documentary Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany, historical context and how the USA’s deliberate “alternative facts” or Eurocentric fabrication of history contributes to continuing racism, colonialism and oppression of Native Americans. Stereotypes are a symptom of the overall disease. Interview and article by Matthias Dell.

Our crowdfunding campaign is in its last days, please help us reach our goal and bring this important project to a wider audience, in its best possible form! At IndieGoGo.


Other recent interviews:

March 14th„Ich bin nur dem Nein begegnet“ at Deutschlandradio Kultur (Interview & podcast, in print & online, link to English version at the bottom of the article)

March 4th– “Glaubensbekenntnis Red Haircrow” at Süddeutsche Zeitung (Interview, in print & online)


Other important links for our documentary:

The Importance of Real Native Stories

a sstepDon’t Let the Sun Step Over You“, the collected stories by Eva Tulene Watt assisted by Keith Basso made me write my mother and say, “Tell me a story”…and she did. She did, and it was good! If you’ve read the work, you’ll know why I add emphasis just so in the previous sentence. And why I wanted to hear from my mother about our people, our cousins, our family, about the past that touches the present and the future. The stories she was told or the things she observed.

Re-reading “Don’t Let the Sun Step Over You” made me want to hear songs. Made me want to hear songs I’d never heard before in this life and songs I already knew. One of them was “I’ve Been Around”, a popular Apache song that somehow voices all those stories of the hardworking, big-hearted, fierce, gentle, humorous, resilient, pragmatic, whimsical and wise Apache. “They’re always walking, walking, going around and doing things. They worked hard!”
I hear my ggrandmother’s voice again, and the stories she told and tried to tell us even when we weren’t listening, only halfway or transfixed cause they seemed light, even funny, but were deep. Stories when she was cooking or cleaning or working or chasing us (me!) with a switch when I had done something she directly told me not to do but I did it anyway because I was stubborn and/or curious.

Stories tell you why you should do things or why not to do other things. They give you purpose. They give you hope. They help you remember why you’re here now, right this very minute and not just what our ancestors endured. Stories help explain why they are important, to be kept, and remembered so our children understand and know. Some stories are shared with non-family, not-of our People, but others are special. Knowing them helps you understand why we defend them and how when someone copies you, culturally appropriates, or takes and changes your stories into their fantasies, these critically important parts of your culture and identity, it is beyond offensive but also really hurtful. Painful. That they do not care, that they make excuses, rationalize or say its just “fantasy” or “honoring” you is even worse. It’s terrible for native identities and cultures. Read the rest of this entry »

Our Workshop at a Indigenous Film Festival in Rostock, Germany, 17 Nov. 2015

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We’re excited to announce that we will again we’ll be giving a workshop at this year’s,  “Tage des indigenen Films” (Day of Indigenous Films)  in Rostock, Germany in cooperation with elements e.V. The event lasts from 16-20 November. Our workshop will be on Tuesday the 17th.

Films we will specifically review are Disney’s “Pocahantas” (and other misrepresentations), Adam Sandler’s “Ridiculous Six”, a German film company’s “The White Comanche” (2014) and Eli Roth’s “The Green Inferno”, which was recently internationally released. Particular discussion will be for the upcoming European release of a new “Winnetou” film, characters created by Karl May, and which continues the practice of cultural appropriation and misrepresentation of Native Americans.

From the elements e.V. website:
“At the film festival will be shown at least six programs: feature films, short films, documentaries and films for young people which address the lives of indigenous and primarily told from the perspective of the indigenous.

In addition, we organize three thematic workshops:

(1) Representations of Indigenous in film. The workshop is organized by indigenous people themselves and carried out. Speaker is D.S. Red Haircrow, author with indigenous background (Chiricahua Apache / Cherokee), and moderation by Carmen Kwasny of the Native American Association of Germany eV (NAAoG eV).

(2) Protected areas: A Space for Indigenous Peoples? The workshop will be conducted in collaboration with Survival International. Speaker is Lea-Kristin Martin of SI Berlin.

(3) The dances of Farotos and palm weaving. The workshop will organize in cooperation with the group Canoafolk from Colombia/Germany.

The film program list and further information about the workshops and the exhibition will be published by the end of October. The on-site photography exhibition will remain through December.

For details about the days of the indigenous film in 2015, please visit:
http://indigen.elements-ev.org/.

On Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/indigenerfilm/.
Native American Association of Germany (NAAoG) website:

http://www.naaog.de/.
On Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/NAAoGeV?fref=ts.